CCC40: First Time I Came

Crimson’s Creative Challenge #40

First time by this way I came, I waded through a streamlet deep
Second time by here I trudged through mud, residual of the water seep
Third time the ground was dry; I wondered why.


35 words. Written for Crimson’s Creative Challenge #40

This little place is locally known as Mud Hole… which is a corruption of Mud Hall, for a century past there was a hall, marked on the map, to left of here. Its bricks and mortar can still be seen poking from the accumulated muck and leaf litter.

In Roman times a stream rose south of here and flowed beneath these steps. That same stream still flows after heavy rains, fed now by buried field drains, the spout of one just visible beside the steps.

About crispina kemp

Spinner of Asaric and Mythic tales
This entry was posted in Crimson's Creative Challenge, History, Mostly Micro, Photos, Poems (Some Silly) and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

61 Responses to CCC40: First Time I Came

  1. Now that you pointed it out I can see the spout. Interesting background on the picture.

    Liked by 1 person

    • crimsonprose says:

      A couple of years back I did a history project focused on the adjacent village. And thus learned of the changing structure of the land. That year (2 years) I spent a lot of time here. Less so since then, but it holds a special place for me.

      Liked by 2 people

  2. Dale says:

    Another lovely way to learn about an area!

    Liked by 2 people

  3. What an interesting background! I would love to visit that place one. You surely have done a lots of research to find so much about it!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Thank you for sharing this with us Crispina! ❀

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Thank you for the history. Very interesting. The poem sums it up beautifully and is very well done.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Jen Goldie says:

    I know a couple of Ladies who might “stumble” upon it. Nice write Crispina! πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Brian Bixby says:

    After reading the history, I reinterpreted the narrator’s progress from being seasonal to being over the centuries.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Laleh Chini says:

    Very interesting background dear.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Pratibha says:

    thought provoking short one !

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Very cool picture, and even cooler story! I think the picture is so homey and peaceful.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Well, a very odd question, but may I draw you someday?

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Jyoti says:

    Wow!! Seems awesome and exciting dear Crispina!!

    Like

  13. Violet Lentz says:

    Once again I am envious of the roots of history with which you Brits are surrounded.. Here in Healy, we have an old deserted bus in which an inexperienced young hiker in search of himself died in 1992… Paled….

    Liked by 1 person

    • crimsonprose says:

      Was a movie made about him? Top of head, don’t remember his name, nor name of movie.
      And yea, I guess we are lucky to have such of history around us. Though I’m sure many Brits take no notice of it. I’m proud of my heritage, and I live to delve deep and discovvery yet more.

      Like

  14. It’s an intriguing photo – I do love steps, particularly ones that don’t seem to go anywhere, and your poem is lyrical and lovely.

    Liked by 1 person

    • crimsonprose says:

      I thank you. It’s a very short poem … but then, it’s only a short flight of steps.
      They do go somewhere. They connect to the next stage of the footpath. Without the steps the walker would have to scramble up quite a steep bank. And hasten its erosion. Plus I wasn’t kidding when I mentioned the flooding. It truly was running as a stream the first time I saw it. Since then I’ve found it either dry, or muddy, but never again in full flood.

      Liked by 1 person

  15. Lovely poem, Crispina. You capture so much in only 35 words! And the history to go with it was interesting to read – I love learning about how places go their names. Fascinating πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

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