Norwich Graffiti

There is a wall in the woods on Mousehold Heath, at Norwich. Just a length of wall. It connects to nothing. It’s not the ruin of some old building. In fact, it looks no more than 30-50 years old. Incongruous amongst the trees. More so with its colourful graffiti.

Mousehold Graffiti

Graffiti amongst the trees on Mousehold Heath: Photo 8th Nov 2017

I claim this as ‘Signage’ in the #2018picoftheweek Challenge.


See #2018picoftheweek for list of categories and further details

About crispina kemp

Spinner of Asaric and Mythic tales
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15 Responses to Norwich Graffiti

  1. Brian Bixby says:

    And it doesn’t seem to belong to anything? Reminds me a bit of this driveway entrance built off the road I use to commute on. The entrance was supposed to be for an office park, but the project fell through for some reason, and for two decades there was just this driveway entrance with a traffic island in it.

    Liked by 1 person

    • crimsonprose says:

      The only thing I can come up with is it was built as part of a rehabilitation program, cos as I took that photo, my back was towards the back of Norwich Prison. Said building and grounds used to be Britannia Barracks, where my father was stationed.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Brian Bixby says:

        And both the Army and prisons are good at coming up with make-work.

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        Exactly. Though it must be said, the prison/barracks perimeter fence does not enclose the wall which is built on land which has, to my knowledge, belonged to Norwich City Council since 1910 (or thereabouts)
        Of course, it could have been erected by Robert Kett and his rebels who camped in the vicinity during their siege of Norwich in (um, can’t remember the date but it was during the reign of the young Edward, son of Henry VIII. ) Although I have to say, these don’t look like Tudor bricks. Too think, too big.

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Judy says:

    Pretty I love the photo .

    Liked by 1 person

    • crimsonprose says:

      I thank you, Judy. And good to see you back online.
      The photo was taken while hunting fungi last November, and I’d so wanted to post it, but it didn’t fit my usual categories. That’s the good thing of this ‘challenge’ I’m following. It has me looking for something ‘new’. Just wish I could get out and take fresh photos, but that’s not going to happen with sub-zero temperatures. I’ve aged into a weather-wimp!

      Like

  3. Love the story behind the photo! Very interesting.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Joy Pixley says:

    How delightfully odd: the wall version of the Bridge to Nowhere. What an interesting contrast, too, to see such urban-feeling graffiti in the midst of a forest. Fascinating!

    Liked by 1 person

    • crimsonprose says:

      Forest you say, yet it’s very close to Norwich, like my daughter and I had walked it, having first visited the cathedral. Yet that wall was . . . peculiar. My daughter was foot-tapping her impatience at me (though she’s usually very patient); we were on the trail of the increasingly rare stinkhorn fungi, it’s ‘scent’ was loud in the air. I’m really glad I took the photo, but having taken it, didn’t know what to do with it. Till now. The contrasts, of colour, or built environment and nature, of what some might see as destruction (I never consider graffiti that) slap bang in an area of conservation.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Joy Pixley says:

        Living in suburban CA where we barely have wild trees, my bar for “forest” is set pretty low these days. I agree with you – the contrasts are what really make this photo pop, both visually and thematically. I’m glad you found the right excuse to post it!

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        If you hold something long enough, the chance will come along.
        Mousehold Heath may not qualify as a ‘forest’, yet the part that remains of it hasn’t seen any cultivation or building since the first reap of the Black Death. And it used to be much more extensive, but agriculture has steadily nibbled its edges. The situation wasn’t stabilised until early last century when it was bought by Norwich City Council as a borough amenity. Which it remains. Has fantastic vies of the city, being up on a hill. Yes, there are hills in Norfolk, just not very high!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Joy Pixley says:

        Sounds like a lovely place for a walk!

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        It is. And much used. Yet it remains unspoiled. I happened to hit it in the height of its autumn glory (November) I intend a return visit as soon as the weather lets up. Ironically, I grew up close to Norwich, spent my late teens/early twenties in the city, and yet never explored the Heath.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Joy Pixley says:

        How nice, that there are still new (old) places for you to discover, after all this time!

        Liked by 1 person

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