Capitals and Columns

21 April 2018

Alas, still unable to wander wide and free; still must draw upon my stores.

There is a triangle of land in SE Norfolk tucked between the river and road where, in Days Gone By, the parishioners hired the services of a stonemason to make ornate the southern entrance to their churches. Many of these remain. Like this one.

Days Gone By, another title achieved in Maria’s Antonia’s #2020picoftheweek

About crispina kemp

Spinner of Asaric and Mythic tales
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24 Responses to Capitals and Columns

  1. Dale says:

    I love your responses to these prompts. And I’m not worried about you… your stores are VAST!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Well, I don’t know about vast, but they’ll probably see me through until I can start shooting again. Trouble is, knowing what I’ve already posted. The CCC ones, those are set apart and titled. but not these ones.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Dale says:

        Oh… I don’t believe it for a second. Methinks we are alike on this one.
        That is difficult, I agree – keeping tabs on what has and hasn’t been used. I have a folder called “blog” and another called “blog done” It helps.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Nah, as I say, except for the CCC pictures, mine all remain in their original first edit/processed folders, by date. However, if I’ve further processed them for use on the blog, then the smaller whatever version will be in the “Awaiting” folder on the CP folder. But mostly they don’t bear a name, just the IMG_No. Yea. Humph. Not terrifically organised.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Dale says:

        No, no, no…. All my photos are all over the place. But when I play with them, put my copyright on them, then I save a copy in the folder mentioned. Just makes it easier to see if I’ve used one or not πŸ˜‰

        Liked by 1 person

      • We are alike, since it’s only I’ve prepped mine for the blog that they find themselves in a folder ready for posting…. πŸ™‚

        Liked by 1 person

      • Dale says:

        Right! πŸ˜‰

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Wow! Nice. Perfect for Days Gone By! I never ceases to amaze me what craftsmen of old could do.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Why the specificity for a southern entrance?

    Liked by 1 person

    • The northern entrance was reserved for corpses… and the devil πŸ™‚

      Liked by 3 people

      • Any particular reason for choosing North for this purpose? Or, is it because watching a rising sun, North will be on your left and left is associated with something sinister, coming from the latin word for “on the left”?

        Liked by 1 person

      • Now there’s a question. And it comes to me in this instant that it could be a Germanic thing. In Germanic paganism, north was the road for the dead. And the dead dwelt beyond the north wind. But there might be an even older explanation. In really ancient myths, the “ruler/king” was said to reside in the pole star… which is the Northernmost star. The actual star has changed many times. At the time of the Yonger Dryas, it was a star in the Eagle constellation… and that’s reflected in the symbolism of many northern peoples. We see the eagle atop a pole or a tree, and around the tree is a serpent… cos around the pole star the Serpent constellation revolves, once every night.

        Liked by 2 people

      • Sounds fascinating. I wasn’t sure about the pole star in the Eagle constellation during Younger Dryas period which was about 12000 years ago but *cursory glance seems to suggest the pole star was Vega in the constellation Lyra. But what’s interesting is that Altair, the brightest star in the Eagle constellation was called the “Eagle star” by ancient Babylonians and has been used for celestial navigation or has had celestial prominence in many ancient civilizations since around or perhaps even before the time pyramids were built (so about 5000 years ago). It really is amazing how we collectively built our faiths and ideas relying on the use of constellations and nature and how ancient myths and lores played a significant part in our everyday lives. πŸ™‚

        Liked by 1 person

      • Lyra is variously portrayed as a vulture or an eagle with a lyre… hence, eagle. But I didn’t know that about Altair.
        We might have forgotten the myths, but they continue to influence our lives.

        Liked by 1 person

      • They certainly do. πŸ™‚

        Liked by 1 person

  4. Joy Pixley says:

    i love old stonework like this — nice shot! Is the reason you can’t go far and wide because of limits on public transportation? That’s frustrating, to be sure. Myself, I have the misfortune to still be recovering from that eye surgery and not able to see well enough to drive, just perfect timing in that I shouldn’t be sharing cars with others, either. (Although a good friend did just drive me to yet another ophthalmologist appointment.) Ah well, not many places I could go, anyway. At least I can still walk around my neighborhood and squint at all the blurry-but-colorful flowers. πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

    • We’re supposed to only make essential journeys. And in some places the cops have been really severe with it, fining people Β£30 on the spot. And with backpack, hiking pole, and a camera case I can’t pretend my journey is for anything other than it is.
      But also, public buses… not the safest place to be during this epidemic. I live in a low case area, but that’s no reason to push my luck on it. Especially not when it’s not a matter of patience.
      And my eyes (or the right, at least) are rapidly deteriotating. I need stronger lens, and I was hoping to get the cataract (right eye is the worst) removed but…. So, you’re not fully alone in not being able to see so well

      Liked by 2 people

      • Joy Pixley says:

        I’m sorry to hear your eye is still getting worse. And no, I wouldn’t ride a bus or subway now either. I feel terrible for those people who have no other way of getting to work at their essential jobs. My comment was more about whether the places you wanted to go weren’t within walking distance. We are limited to essential errands here in California, in terms of going places where other people would be, including not having social visits. But the grocery stores and pharmacies are open, and some other stores too. There are many restaurants that do delivery or drive-through pick-up, even some that have curbside service where you pop your trunk and they put the food in — you don’t even have to roll down your window (I hear). But with me not being able to drive, I just have my groceries delivered (no contact, just dropped off) and cook at home. (Although I might splurge on a restaurant delivery again, to support our local workers.)

        The governor has clarified that going outside in your own neighborhood for exercise or walking dogs is still fine, as long as you practice proper social distancing — only walk with other members of your household and stay at least 6 feet away from everyone else, and wear a mask in case you have to pass someone else. You can even go to a park and throw a ball around, as long as it’s just with your family. All the public facilities are shut down though (playgrounds, bathrooms). I think it’s a reasonable rule, but I’m dismayed by how many people I see on my morning walks who aren’t wearing masks, especially older people! We don’t have cops wandering around our quiet little neighborhood at 6:30 am to see them, but security guards are monitoring the stores and other inside places much more carefully.

        Liked by 1 person

      • I think I’ve said before, I can get to Breydon Water. But as soon as we have a good weather day, it gets popular with walkers, and dogwalkers and birdwatchers… and then the helicopters come out. At least we don’t get drones. πŸ™‚

        Liked by 1 person

      • Joy Pixley says:

        Yes, that’s the problem with the outdoor areas. They’re perfectly safe for a few people here and there, but once you start getting crowds it’s a problem. And of course, each person thinks all would be fine if the *other* people would just leave. Wise of you to stay away preemptively.

        Liked by 1 person

      • I’m happy to wait… and to go on the less favourable days

        Liked by 1 person

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