Friday Flauna: A Snail’s Trail

I love the pretty shells of our native snails, and having caught these two napping, I thought I’d share …

photo 8th July 2019: copyright crispina kemp

I don’t know enough about snails to name either of these. I checked out wikipedia. And came away exhausted. TMI! Anyway, both were found along a footpath between Oulton Broad and Carlton Colville Marshes … if that gives anyone more knowledgeable than me a clue to their identity.

photo 8th July 2019: copyright crispina kemp

About crispina kemp

Spinner of Asaric and Mythic tales
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23 Responses to Friday Flauna: A Snail’s Trail

  1. Jen Goldie says:

    You really got good closeups on both! Nice work. 😊

    Liked by 1 person

  2. The one the bottom is a Brown-lipped snail. So named because of it’s obvious brown ring on the whorl and most importantly because the opening of the shell is covered with a brown ring as well which distinguished it from a White-lipped snail, whose shell opening is a white ring. The picture above possibly could be a White Lipped snail which are usually smaller than the Brown lipped snails and have the distinguishing white bands on the whorl. Both these snail species occur in a variety of different colors but the Brown and the White rings in the opening of the shell is the main way how you would differentiate them. Both snails are common terrestrial snails in the UK.
    Beautiful pictures, Crispina! 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    • crimsonprose says:

      I thank you. And now I know which snails they are. I know the colours can change according to environment and the foods they’re munching on, which is why I included where I’d found them.

      Liked by 1 person

      • You know the picture on the top, it’s amazing and I only wish you had taken more shots (not a critique, just a simple wish) because when I zoomed in on the snail, it just sits in such a wonderful way….especially the lighting around it makes a huge difference. It made me smile. 🙂
        However, if such an in-depth comment makes you uncomfortable in any way, do say so and in future I’ll restrict my commentary.

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        You may offer comments as in-depth as you like. I was restricted in the view as it had to be taken from the footpath. I’m not overly keen on trudging through reedbeds, which is what lay beyond it.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Oh, okay. No, I don’t want you to wade through the wilderness just for a better shot either! 😅 I have made foolish mistakes of going too far to get that “perfect” click, only to fall flat on my face with a mouth full of weed. 😋 I love both the pictures and I am glad I could help with the information.

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        Appreciated. I have met with a few accidents in pursuit of that one exquisite shot.

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        And I’ve just thought. I suppose I could have come at it from underneath. Except I try to avoid the acrobatics while carrying a backpack. That’s how I misaligned my sacri-iliac joint three years back. And I still get the odd twinge from it. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • I completely understand. I just wrote the very first thought that came into my mind while admiring that picture. Don’t pay another thought to it. I should have realized that you would have taken the shot had it been safer to do so. Really, I have done my fair share of acrobatics and it’s not worth it if afterwards you have to spend a couple of days in bed just to recuperate from your adventure. 🙂
        Please be careful out there. I love the pictures but I admire the photographer more. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        I appreciate your interest. Although I take the photos from some kind of compulsion, it is good to know that others see them, and like them. I wish I could post more but … there’d be no room for words.

        Liked by 1 person

  3. Violet Lentz says:

    They are pretty. I have a tendency to collect shells, only to find out I have no place to keep them. let us know if you find out anything of interest about them.

    Like

    • crimsonprose says:

      Well, I have a name for them now. The top one is a White Lipped snail. The bottom one is a Brown Lipped snail. Both are common in the UK.
      And I too collect shells, sea-shells. I can’t go to the beach without picking up at least one. And stones.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Dale says:

    They are lovely – especially because they are not in your vegetable garden eating away at your food!

    Liked by 2 people

    • crimsonprose says:

      These aren’t the ones we get on our gardens … at least not around here (where I used to live, yea). Our flower-petal nibblers are the French variety, the ones they eat. I’m not sure when they arrived .. with Romans or Normans, or whether they hitched a ride on a ship, this being a port … but they arrived here and multiplied and out-competed the prettier versions.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Dale says:

        That’s good, then!
        A friend spends her time battling them in her garden..

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        Crushed eggshells, dried holly leaves and coffee grinds, all make excellent deterents. And if all else fails, chilli peppers will assassinate them.

        Liked by 2 people

      • Dale says:

        I should let her know…

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        It worked for me. But I had flowers in pots, and the dratted things kept finding bridges. That’s when I discovered chilli peppers. Quite by accident. But this place is totally thick with the French variety I’ve given up (I’m told our Spanish and Portugese neighbours gather them up and put them on a raw potato diet for a couple of weeks and then eat them. I’m not that keen on shellfish, so I’m not going there). I have loads of houseplants instead.

        Liked by 1 person

  5. I would name them Josephus and Priscilla.

    Liked by 1 person

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