What Pegman Saw: The Word of Grandfather-God

Pinar del Rio: Image by Murat Çelik on Google Maps

“Your Excellency.” Padre Bartolomé bowed his head and waited, a flick of his hand to the lad behind him, Bori-Damaso.

Diego Velázquez de Cuéllar looked up from the papers cluttering his makeshift desk.

Padre Bartolomé took that as permission to say more. “You enquired of the crops these Taino-folk grow.’

“Of the leaf, sí, that they do not eat.”

“It is their god.”

The lad, Bori-Damaso, waiting behind him, grunted something inaudible, his shaken head vehement that Bartolomé had said it wrong.

“Let the boy speak,” said de Cuéllar.

“Not god,” Bori-Damaso said. “Voice of god.”

De Cuéllar sat back to consider him. “Voice…? As in our Bible?”

“Sí, our grandfather-god sent tobacco to take his place among men. When we smoke, we talk with him.”

“He speaks good Spanish,” de Cuéllar observed.

“My son,” Padre Bartolomé said.


Wordcount: 139

Written for What Pegman Saw: Cuba

 

 

 

About crispina kemp

Spinner of Asaric and Mythic tales
This entry was posted in History, Mostly Micro and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

10 Responses to What Pegman Saw: The Word of Grandfather-God

  1. Violet Lentz says:

    What an original take! Oh, this is excellent!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Joy Pixley says:

    Interesting, I’d never heard that kind of ritual or myth about tobacco. You are an endless source of arcane knowledge, Crispina!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Oh this is great, Crispina. What a ritual you have captured. What a way to talk with the Gods. The pride and passion in this prose wafted over me without making me splutter once!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. k rawson says:

    A most excellent story! The concept of tobacco as a party line to god isn’t one I’ve heard of. So fascinating! I want to read the whole book.

    Liked by 1 person

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