Sunday Picture Post: Big and Bold

Some wild flowers shout of their presence from a great distance.

Ox-eyed Daisies: 4th June 2019

The Poppy: 4th June 2019

Alas, this has been a week of almost continual rain. So the camera stayed in. These were taken the previous week

About crispina kemp

Spinner of Asaric and Mythic tales
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47 Responses to Sunday Picture Post: Big and Bold

  1. Very pretty! The poppy is perfectly shaped.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Lynn Love says:

    Weather’s been awful, hasn’t it? We’ve been told it’s destroyed some of the British flower crops for this year, so are expecting big gaps in our shop’s supply where there should be sweet williams, sweet peas, etc. All those poor growers! Nice to see your photos though

    Liked by 2 people

    • crimsonprose says:

      I noticed some sweet williams the other day in Sainsburys but they didn’t invite me to buy. I ended up with carnations again.
      Despite the weather warnings, GY hasn’t had it too bad. But we have weather warnings for thunderstorms Tuesday and Wedsnesday. The associated heavy downpours can do the worst damage in such a short time.
      So, I’m out with the camera tomorrow in the hope of local orchids.
      Yea, I feel for the smallholder who relies on the summer crops to make their money

      Liked by 2 people

      • Lynn Love says:

        Apparently, that cold snap early in the spring did for some flowers, now these heavy rains. I wouldn’t like to rely on an annual crop for my livelihood. Makes you realise how easily we could slip into famine before the globalised nature of food sourcing. All it takes is a few bad summers …

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        Yea. Despite bad warnings last week, all week had was day upon day of rain, but it wasn’t sufficiently heavy to destroy crops. Just persistent. And have you heard the latest from Nasa? The next solar cycle (starting next year) is likely to be the weakest since the Dalton Minimum. That means more of the weather extremes, with some parts of the world slipping into almost ice-age type weather. Hopefully it won’t be too bad in the UK, but judging by how parts of Europe and America have been this past year … it could be terrible for them. And of course, their production goes down … We are so dependant upon that sun. Is it a wonderful it was considered the prime god.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Lynn Love says:

        It’s hammered down the last few days – Biblical at times. Periods like the Little Ice Age must have been terrifying for people who are entirely reliant on what they can produce themselves. And if the climate is going that way again … Better dig up my flowers and plant some turnips

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        I believe around the world there are some governments who recommend we prepare. For the past year or so, the weather scientists and/or astonomers have cogitated, will the next solar cycle be the one. They arrive in 200-250 years cycles. But until recently they were thinking it wouldn’t happen until 2030. Bit of a shock to know its been moved forward. But governments are mostly down-playing it. They don’t want to incite panic. And while it could be tough for a few years, it’s not exactly the *end of life on earth as we know it*. We’ve survived them before. And the real problem doesn’t li with crazy extreme weather but the fact that the earth’s crust is so senstive to changes in the sun; we could have major earth and volcanic eruptions. The potential for major eruptions is the worst thing. I don’t need to paint that picture, I know you can work that out.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Lynn Love says:

        Really? The eruptions sound terrifying, especially in places that are already prone to them. I hope the scientists are wrong.

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        Alas, I doubt it. I don’t understand the mechanics, but it is proven that earthquakes and volcanic eruptions are (in some way) linked to solar activity, and there is no doubt that during the past 12-18 months the sun’s activity has been exceptionally weak. And witness the freak weather worldwide, and though it doesn’t hit our news programmes, even now there are signs.
        Not the first time, Lynn. This is a regular cycle. Just it’s the first time with worldwide news coverage.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Lynn Love says:

        … And exacerbated by man made global warming too. We’re in for tough times, then

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        The camp is divided on whether the global warming is man-made or not. Not an argument I’m going to get into. Time will tell. And were it not for the warming, we could be in for worse.

        Like

  3. Dale says:

    Gorgeous!
    Of course, I expect nothing less..\

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Violet Lentz says:

    I saw one similar to the second one here yesterday in the woods by the golf course. I’ll go get a picture and see if they are the same.. I can’t imagine poppies in Alaska, but you never know….

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Saania2806 says:

    That’s very pretty!

    Liked by 1 person

  6. These look so beautiful ❀️ Weather here has been changing. We had rains the other day and today is just too hot. I hope you had a nice sundayπŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Jen Goldie says:

    Lovely photos Crispina πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Joy Pixley says:

    I hope the rain lets up, both for the sake of the farmers and for the sake of the photographers (and by association, those of us who benefit from those photographs)! Lovely shots of the daisies and the poppy — and it’s interesting to focus in like that, when so often we’re looking at the joint effect of a whole field of them.

    Liked by 1 person

    • crimsonprose says:

      I think it’s my thing to focus in close, reveal the detail that tends to be overlooked.
      And today has been sweltering hot; thankfully with a good breeze (though a breeze toss the flowers about). So now we’re due for thunderstorms.
      I noticed the feilds of barley and wheat on the way into Norwich … so much damaged … looks like the wind/rain had attempted some fancy crop circles, but didn’t quite get it right.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Joy Pixley says:

        That makes me realize that I almost never see photos of nature’s destruction — the beauty of a lightning storm, but not the aftermath on the flowers or crops. Of course, that’s not as pretty, but fiction often deals with topics that are not pretty, and many readers are drawn to them because of that darkness. Hmm, interesting first-morning thoughts…

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        I shall bear that in mind. I tend to dut those parts out, but ….

        Liked by 1 person

      • Joy Pixley says:

        I can see why people don’t do it much. But you’re a great photographer, with a wonderful eye for composition and color; if anyone could make destroyed plants look artistic, I’m sure you could.

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        You are a silver-tongued Gemini, and I am a sucker for flattery. And it so happens I took some photos yesterday, though I haven’t yet processed them, that might be what you’re after. If so, I’ll email them to you. πŸ™‚

        Liked by 1 person

      • Joy Pixley says:

        Just an honest compliment, I assure you. (Sometimes I wish I were silver-tongued, but I’ll admit that I haven’t the wit.) And if you like the photos, share them on your blog so that everyone can see them.

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        We’ll see. Haven’t reached those ones yet.

        Liked by 1 person

  9. These are beautiful! The detail is so vivid and the colours so bright πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

    • crimsonprose says:

      As the title says … But so many of the photos I take have teeny-weeny flowers are their subject. And this weekend I’m posting a whole host of flowers. Our hedgerows are alive with them.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Very true. The hedgerows are beautiful at this time of year. I’m looking forward, as always, to see what you have captured. πŸ™‚
        And, after your posting last week of the yellow iris, I, rather proudly, spotted one for myself. I was out with my family at the time, and didn’t I sound very clever when I told them that I had recently learnt they’re also called yellow flag. So thank you πŸ˜€

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        A pleasure, Sammi. There are three posts this weekend that carry flowers. Though you’ve already seen the butterfly bedecked hogweed.

        Like

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