This Eden in the East

Raja Ampat Regency

Raja Ampat Regency, West Papua: photo from Google Maps

Far out to sea beneath the heavy swell
There is a land the ancients trod, so I hear tell.
Their way of life we cannot know,
What they ate, what plants did grow;
They fished, of that no doubts Iโ€™ve got,
But did they fashion clay to pots?
They knew the skies
And they were wise,
They knew to sail a boat,
To navigate and stay afloat.

They were there once, they are no more,
Fled before a rising tide eight thousand years before,
Drowned now beneath three hundred feet at least,
This garden, this Eden in the East


99 words

Written for What Pegman Saw: Raja Ampat Regency, West Papua

 

 

 

 

 

About crispina kemp

Spinner of Asaric and Mythic tales
This entry was posted in Mostly Micro, Poems (Some Silly) and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

39 Responses to This Eden in the East

  1. Violet Lentz says:

    Gorgeous choice of stories to tell.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Jen Goldie says:

    Beautifully penned and somehow poignant. Wonderful write Crispina ๐Ÿ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Fantastically written! I enjoyed it thoroughly ๐Ÿ™‚ Kudos!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Lynn Love says:

    wonderfully lilting poem, carrying us along on waves of words. It does, indeed look like an Eden, the greenery so lush, the sea so blue. And a fascinating thought, all those civilisations washed away by the rising seas. Grand stuff

    Liked by 1 person

    • crimsonprose says:

      I thank you, Lynn, though I have to own to the inspiration.
      Eden in the East was a book written by Stephen Oppenheimer in which he puts forward his speculation that the peoples dispursed by the flooding of Sunderland and Sahul when the waters beneath the Laurentide Glacier gushed into the seas were then responsible for the sudden growth of several cultures around the Near and MIddle East. While I wasn’t impressed with his supporting evidence, yet it must be admitted that people did live there, and were scattered by the flood. But he would make it The Flood, where I would not.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Lynn Love says:

        I’m sure there was a flood (or several) in ancient times – many cultures have such myths – but The Flood, I think not. People are very good at seeing evidence through their own world view, aren’t they? A deeply Christian person would use evidence of a flood to reinforce the story of Noah and the Ark, whereas I’m fascinated to learn about the real catastrophic event that inspired the Bible story, not believing it a judgement from a divine being. Each to their own. Fact is you took inspiration from something you’d learned elsewhere and made it your own. Writers are magpies, after all – we snatch at the shiny things that attract us and build our nests around them :). Hope you’re well, Crispina

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        I am exceedingly well, Lynn, and I thank you for asking. And you? I see less of your posts.
        But to return to floods and theories, I purposely read such speculative books, and watch similar on YouTube precisely because they’re a great source of inspiration. But I also do my best to stay up to date on all the latest geological, archaeological, genetic and linguistic research.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Lynn Love says:

        Yes, I’ve been away from the blog for almost a month, trying to get the ‘final’ version of my novel ready. I’ve gone through the notes from the betas, implemented (most of) their advice and the MS is with a proof reader now. Hoping to send it out to agents later this year – that’ll be the terrifying moment, wondering what reception it will get.
        Back to floods, it is good to read/watch a range of things, even if they’re not what you’re ordinarily drawn to. We recently watched a documentary featuring Goebbel’s secretary and her psychology was fascinating – a rather frivolous young woman with Jewish friends who ended up in the bunker along with the highest members of the Nazi regime. Moral ambiguity is fascinating for writers

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        Hey, I wish you the best with the novel.
        And you’ve just justified my often dubious view behaviour. No TV, I only watch what’s on YouTube. And some of that’s good, like the lectures from various universities and museums. But, oh boy, there are some freaky-weird stuff too!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Lynn Love says:

        Nothing wrong with freaky or weird if you can justify it as research for your writing! It does all feed in to the stories, though, doesn’t it? I’m always seeing a location or a job I’d like to set a story around. Saw a short 1970s doc about lighthouse keepers and have set a serial there and this snippet from Pathe about London Underground ‘fluffers’ – setting a story in this world too ๐Ÿ™‚
        https://www.britishpathe.com/video/a-city-sleeps-aka-tube-fluffers

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        Thanks for link.
        As you know, my fictional focus is pre-history. So, documentaries regarding same, and anthropology. And I particularly like the TEDX talks, where the focus is relationship psychology. Doesn’t matter the setting. folks is folks.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Lynn Love says:

        It’s true. I thought the same about Goebbel’s secretary – you could transfer such a character to innumerable times and places and she’d be interesting.

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        Ah, the writer’s many and unlikely sources, eh.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Lynn Love says:

        And thank you for the good wishes ๐Ÿ™‚

        Liked by 1 person

  5. Joy Pixley says:

    Nice legendary feel to this one. I especially respond to that nostalgia for the lost spaces from history that we can never really know.

    Liked by 1 person

    • crimsonprose says:

      I thank you, Joy.
      Sundaland and Sahul has become the place par excellence for speculation. But I wanted to get away from the more extreme takes: no high technology here, though perhaps a dispersal of myths.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Amazing. I enjoyed the little story you described so well๐Ÿ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

  7. k rawson says:

    Lovely and lyrical. I always love your poems. I just hope this lovely spot doesn’t end up underwater again, though I like where you took this.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Dale says:

    Beautifully done, Crispina. As others have said, lilting and lovely!

    Liked by 1 person

  9. neha98blog says:

    Such a delight it is to read your poems,I read it two times and the effect that it has left in my mind is just the same.

    Liked by 1 person

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