For England and St George

St George (left). England’s Protector, Celebrate today 23rd April

I am a female English born, my birth-certificate tells me so;
Though I will admit a tiny bit (1% of the total genome) in the Levant began long ago.
Doubtless that bit joined the Diaspora, at least for the one lustful night,
For the Jews of Europe contributed another itsy-bitsy 1-part-in-a-100-byte.
And I’m thinking my itsy-bitsy Jewish ‘bit’ to-or-from Russia did emigrate
Which explains that further 1%. Totting it, that makes 3%. Great.

The olive groves of Italy and Greece donated 2% of me
And the passionate paella-eaters of Iberia added a further 3.
Could this 5% be the combined contribution of the Roman invasion?
Yet it’s the bigger chunks are my forefathers most recent donation.

A whole 20% from the Celtic fringe
From Scotland, a redhead nicknamed Ginge.
Add 19% from the Vikings and Danes.
Yet a measly 3 from this land of leafy green lanes!

So whence the rest, the other half of this English lass with an English past?
From Germany, Netherlands, Flanders and France
I’m a typically English lass, made from nights of foreign romance.


A modern take on The True-Born Englishman by Daniel Defoe

Poem for St George

About crispina kemp

Spinner of Asaric and Mythic tales
This entry was posted in History, Poems (Some Silly), Thoughts and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

28 Responses to For England and St George

  1. Lynn Love says:

    This is what makes the concept of ‘Englishness’ so complex and so ridiculous. We’re a mongrel breed and have been for millenia. People who want immigrants to return to their native lands need to have their own DNA tested, as you did. See how much of their ancestry is pure ‘English’.

    Liked by 1 person

    • crimsonprose says:

      There is no such thing as pure English. As an island, we eit at the edge of the continent. Until America was opened, where else was there to go, but to Britain. It began at the end of the Ice Age, and hasn’t stopped yet.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Lynn Love says:

        All so true. That’s why anti-immigration is such a nonsense. This country wouldn’t exist without it

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        This is true. Though the counter-argument is, we keep taking them in, do we have room? But that ignores the fact that the UK-born also move on to oher lands. Swings, roundabiuts, the scales eventually balance. 4500 years ago, the incoming Beaker-bearing, Indo-European speaking, horse-riders who were to usher in the Bronze Age replaced 80% of the British population. That ells its own story.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Lynn Love says:

        Well, our population is growing and apparently, much of that is down to immigration, though more of us are still being born than dying each year. It’s a hard one. Eventually, we will have to say no. There’s a housing crisis as it is, with flats being thrown up everywhere in Bristol and I’m sure it’s the same elsewhere. Hard decisions ahead, though I’m still anti Brexit! Was it as much as 80%? Wow. That’s extraordinary. Interesting folk, the Beaker People. They covered a large area of the world a very long time ago. They liked to travel, that’s for sure.

        Like

      • crimsonprose says:

        They were horsemen, not only rode horses but hitched them to a wagon … so it’s said. Though the earliest images of wagons show them pulled by oxen.
        One wonders at their drive? Was it only to find fresh land? Were they really so land-hungry? Or was it something cultural and religious. A warrior culture, Was the quest for new land part of the initiation rites? If a warrior led his people to a new land, did he then claim a special place in their warrior-heaven?

        Liked by 1 person

      • Lynn Love says:

        It’s all so intriguing because there is so little left of the culture, isn’t there, with really only the pottery left to show us where they went. Makes them good to speculate over

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      • crimsonprose says:

        Mmm. there’s a bit more than the pottery. It was the Beaker People who erected the stones at Stonehenge, that’s not been confirmed. There were 2 diiferent peoples who received the same archaeological label. Thanks to aDNA it’s now possible to distinguish them and follow their roots. The earliest arose in Iberian Peninsula, known as the Bell Beakers, roamed eastward where the encountered the Corded Ware/Funnel-Neck Beaker Folk, who show a high admixture of Yamnaya genes, believed to be the bearers of Indo-European language, with a homeland on the North Pontic Steppes, these were the horse-riders and kurgan builders. The two different lineages got it together around the Rhine and set up in present day Netherlands, from whence they crossed the North Sea and arrived, lo! Here.
        Yea, I have followed the developments around these people for a long-long time. I remember reading, back in 1980s, Graham Clarke’s (hope I have the name right) PhD thesis regards the origin of Bell Beakers. Now aDNA has proven him right.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Lynn Love says:

        This is really interesting. I shall have to read up more about them as I didn’t realise that much was known. I thought it was only the pottery that was seen as the common denominator. I do love the snippets of history I learn through you, Crispina. You’re very knowledgeable. 🙂

        Like

      • crimsonprose says:

        I thank you. Though, as with anyone, I only know about the things that interest me. Prehistory, especially as it relates to Britain and Western Europe, and the ensuing ‘history’ which starts with the Romans. And then, clonk, we reach the Tudors and thereafter, my interest falters.
        And, of course, with prehistory comes mythology.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Lynn Love says:

        I do love a Tudor, a Roman, a Victorian, the medieval period (the middle ages are endlessly fascinating to me, from pilgrimages to religious orders to plague and all those supernatural beliefs. It’s a rich period?. I only have smatterings of knowledge in any of it, though. Funny how we’re drawn to certain eras and not others.

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        Someone who believes in reincarnaion might suggest that we’ve previously lived in those eras. More likely in something totaaly unconnected resonated with us on first contact. It might just be a name that reminds us of someone beloved; or maybe we were having a good day when we first stumbled across this. Or we’re channeling …. best stop there 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • Lynn Love says:

        Ha! I used to love the idea of channelling a past life. I remember walking into some lovely Tudor manor house when I was a teenager, feeling very much at home there. I feel the same about the sea, despite not knowing anything about it. Part of me belongs near it. These days, my cynical mind attributes these feelings to early experiences – my mum’s house was full of history books and I loved sitting at the top of the stairs in the quiet, flicking through the pages. I just know wandering through history – in fiction, in my academic efforts – has brought me huge pleasure. And that is enough for me

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        I can ditto most of that, certainly mirror it. I even have a theory that allows it. But … let’s just say it’s something I keep to myself these days., Don’t want to be labelled as lunatice fringe. 🙂

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      • Lynn Love says:

        Sounds interesting … I like the idea of past lives but I don’t know. Most people who claim to have had them were queens or notable people, where most of us would have been nobodies. Makes for interesting stories though

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        It’s those over-bright claims that casts the entire belief into the dakr pits of craziness. Yet in India, where it’s part of the Hindu & Buddhist religions, most claimants to a past life as merely ordinary folk, perhaps from the next village along.
        I was raised in the belief, but my analytical mind wouldn’t allow it. And so I researched, and read and read, trying to find some way to fit belief and science together. And I found it. And still I keep quiet about it. Because it requires a belief in another dimension, and although astronomy admits of several of those, astronomy doesn’t admit of the spirit. You might have noticed from one or two of my posts, that I do … in the gnostic sense. Spirit, one, whole, not soul disparate.

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  2. Brian Bixby says:

    You should do a map, “The Erotic Encounters of Crispina’s Diverse DNA.”
    I did a much simpler version earlier this year, just showing where all the births and marriages of the Scottish branch of my family took place. Unlike your family, it was fairly boring.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Jen Goldie says:

    First read this morning and extremely enjoyable. Put a smile on my sleepy face. Perhaps I’ll register, with What’s that place? Oh, Ancestry dot com. The English got around didn’t they! Thank’s Crispina 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Violet Lentz says:

    I believe if the truth is told we are all just the froth on the melting pot. Excellent bit of writing, Crispina.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Excellent post. The USA is considered a melting pot as well…all the immigrant stories.

    Liked by 1 person

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