Sunday Picture Post: Crimson Catkins

The catkins of hazel fall like golden showers in spring; the catkins of willow are popularly known as pussy willow. But what about these?

black poplar catkins

The crimson catkins od the black poplar tree: 28 March 2019

Black Poplar is one of my favourites. Soon the leaves will appear, as fresh and sweet as the beech, with the autumnal tints of the oak.

About crispina kemp

Spinner of Asaric and Mythic tales
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20 Responses to Sunday Picture Post: Crimson Catkins

  1. Dale says:

    My favourites are the pussy willows… but these, these are quite wow!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Violet Lentz says:

    I’ve never seen these, but I love Pussy Willows, which I have never had the delight of seeing since my youth in Ohio… Sweet remembrance.

    Liked by 1 person

    • crimsonprose says:

      Well, depending on results of next camera-excursion, there might be pussy-willows next week. Indeed, I might feature several of the willows. I’m accumulating them. 🙂

      Like

  3. One of mine too Crispina, we have two venerable old poplars in the park at the end of the road.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Ennle Madresan says:

    Interesting, I didn’t know their name before 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Joy Pixley says:

    I learned a new word today: catkin! Apparently the word comes from the Dutch for kitten, because they resemble kitten’s tails: very cute. These look more regal than the word would imply though, more like furry cocoons of some magical insect.

    Liked by 2 people

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