Once Upon A Brittle Stem

Last Monday I went for a walk … into Fairy Land. All along the side of the path … it must have continued for as much as mile … these fairy trees.

Brittlestem fungi

Fairy trees? Or one of the several brittlestem species of fungi? Photo 22nd Oct 2018

I’m not sure which of the brittlestem species but I believe they’re closely related to the inkcaps. Or is it just that they both have black spores.

My claim in the #2018picoftheweek challenge for Fairy Tale.

 

About crispina kemp

Spinner of Asaric and Mythic tales
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43 Responses to Once Upon A Brittle Stem

  1. Lynn Love says:

    Really gorgeous. Just love these spindly things. Had not idea such things even existed

    Liked by 1 person

    • crimsonprose says:

      It was a case of stand back in amazement, stand on one leg in amazement, fall over in amazement. They lined the path, sometimes in clusters like this, in some places showing only a splatter. Previously I’d seen them only as ones and twos. Yea, amazing.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Lynn Love says:

        They look unreal all together, don’t they, as if planted on the set of a fantasy film. A lovely find, Crispina

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        I have a couple of shots included in the slideshow I use on my laptop’s deskstop, and I keep expecting to see the Seven Dwarves come trooping by. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • Lynn Love says:

        Haha! Nice 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        I can almost imagine Klukelunnen playing ring-a-roses amongst them. Except I’d be more likely to see him in Gough’s Cave or Wookey Hole.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Lynn Love says:

        I do enjoy a cave. Perhaps it was living so close to Poole’s Cavern in Buxton when I was growing up. They’re just so damn intriguing, aren’t they? Filled with prehistoric bones and stunning geology, often associated with witches, hideouts for thieves and robbers. Grand things

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        I remember my visit to Cheddar (I was staying in B&B at Wells), I went through 2 36 exp films going round those caves. Yes, and that dates my visit. And Wookey. Gosh, you can get lost in Wookey, it’s huge. I drawn on both visits for certain scenes in the Asaric Tales books.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Lynn Love says:

        I’ve only been to Wookey with young kids and so they wanted to race through the caves and on to the other attractions. But those caves are amazing – some glorious features. Lovely to have your experiences to draw on for the books too – gives an authentic feel

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        Yea, that’s the reason Book Three turned out to be longer than the others, cos that’s where most of my memories reside. I’m hoping the beta readers will help me reduces it. No! I scream, but I want that memory left in!

        Liked by 2 people

      • Lynn Love says:

        Murdering those darlings, eh? So difficult to do. You could always write a short story with the cut out bits, the ‘unseen footage’ from that section of the book. Give it away for free when readers buy the books or when they sign up to your email list. Nothing is ever a waste of writing time, is it?

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        What a brilliant idea. Like the gag reel included on most DVDs. Outtakes.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Lynn Love says:

        I’ve seen other authors do it, giving short stories away or ‘how to’ guides as inducements to hand over cash or email details. I’ve done it myself. We all love a freebee 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        I had thought to offer a separate, stand alone Asaric story as a taster. But ,,, I’m not good at short stories. I also thought of a non-fiction type book, that opens up the world underlying the Asaric tales. Perhaps in encyclopedic format. Like a long glossary, but more indepth.

        Liked by 2 people

      • Lynn Love says:

        Ooh, I like that idea – especially if you’re not too happy writing short stories. ‘The world of Asaric Tales’ kind of thing, giving the history of the world, its myths, its people? Love that idea

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        And of course, I do have all my notes. Besides, I’ve lived in that world for so long now, I know it upside down and inside out.

        Liked by 1 person

  2. How enchanting! Yes, I can see the fairies hiding behind their trees 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Judy says:

    Ouuu this is a very cool image …..and magical.

    Liked by 1 person

    • crimsonprose says:

      I thank you, Judy. Myself and Shen just went, Wow, wow, wow, we couldn’t believe it. We spent ages taking shots from all angles. But it was dark there, much shaded by tress … though you can’t see on this shot the abundance of ivy. In places the little conical heads peer out like kids from beneath a deep duvet.

      Like

      • Brian Bixby says:

        Ah, so Shen was involved. That explains it. 😉

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        Don’t be rotten. It’s her birthday day after tomorrow, so tomorrow (this is her logic) she’s round for lunch, a game of upwards, and whichever of my DVDs she hasn’t yet seen. That’s the event of the year!

        Like

      • Brian Bixby says:

        I’ve think you’ve mistaken my meaning, which means of course I was not clear. I was saying, oh, you ran into magical stuff, and oh, you had Shen with you, and those things are connected. Which I thought was meant to be a compliment to your daughter. Clearly didn’t come across that way. Sorry.

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        Sort of not. Though I didn’t take offence. I took it as your dry sense of humour. I mean, I know you know she was born at midnight, and during a thunderstorm, and that she has a certain attraction to zombies, vampires and the otherwise unworldly. So of course we’d see fairies while she was with me. Though, let’s not forget, it was me who taught her that was of looking beyond the veil. All of which should have been said last week. Never mind. We have Guy Fawkes night tonight, with fireworks enough to send the undead back to their tombs. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • Brian Bixby says:

        Then I have failed to appreciate the subtlety of your humor, Ms. Crispina. Please do not have Shen put a hex on me. What would happen to EJ?

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        Nay, nay, my lord, though scoundrel you are, I would never allow fair maiden Shen to hexagram you.
        BTW: I’ve just unwrapped tonight’s entertainment. Yet ANOTHER Robin Hood movie (to add to my collection) And a bonus freebie of ANOTHER King Arthur movie to add to that collection. So if I don’t respond for a while as yet, it’s cos the film is reasonably good. 🙂 Tell E.J. you’re save from witchery, at least for tonight.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Brian Bixby says:

        Clearly if you’re going to debase your daughter, it must be for worthier goals! And let me win my way back into your good graces (I hope) by saying that the Robin Hood British TV series from the 1950s, rebroadcast on American TV, was one of my favorite programs growing up.

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        Was that the one with Richard Green? If so, it was the cause of my very first exercise in making a long bow (from a hazel stem) and arrows (alas, only from elder with sharpened points, in doing which I all but sharpened my finger and had to be rushed to A&E. But I did learn in future to weild the knife away from me. You see, this period of history was always obsessed me.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Brian Bixby says:

        Yes, it was. While we got the Boston channels, we could also get channel 9 in Manchester, N.H. Channel 9 wasn’t financially very well-off, and they ran all sorts of old programs. The Richard Greene series was a weekday afternoon staple in the 1960s.

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        Kids TV for us, too. And we’d play out the stories. We,, sort off. Ramping through a woods as old as Sherwood (maybe older) though not as extensive, the property in Robin’s day of the Breton earls of Richmond. Tough maybe by then it was in the hands of a married-on relative, Vicomte Alain de Rohan. I just love that name. Yep. just like Robin, we were trespassing, but the place was abandoned so no one much bothered.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Brian Bixby says:

        The Rohans remained a powerful French family, and they turn up in the Affair of the Diamond Necklace (as does Cagliostro, which is how we know of it) just before the French Revolution. We saw the Rohan residences in Paris and Strassbourg from that era.

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        I knew you’d know the name. They only briefly had the estate. There were contretemps regarding King John and the young Breton heir to Richmond. The estate was given over to the Savoys to eventually end up in the hands of Queen Mary who betowed it uppn sssshssh, you know who.

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        You know what annoys me about these films (same as those set in Roman times)? No one knows how to turn a hem. Without it their weaving quickly frays. That’s stupid. Oh, what I could teach these movemakers!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Brian Bixby says:

        Remind us never to send you back in a time machine. You’d go native in a minute, trying to investigate the clothing and other fabrics.

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        Yep. Sure would. To find out exactly what dyes they used. And what fibres. It’s all but forgotten that they used fibres from nettle and hemp.
        BTW: did you know that during WWII, being short of fabrics, Hitler clothed his soldiers in nettle-cloth? To quote a country-man, not a lot of people know that. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • Brian Bixby says:

        Nor did I. Darn, there goes my fictional Nazi dress code!

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        Yea, you never see that on the movies.

        Liked by 1 person

  4. Dale says:

    Definitely an enchanting fairy land!!

    Liked by 1 person

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