An Apprentice Ship

So I left the house at quarter-to-eight, turned right into the row (that’s a very narrow lane to you, speciality of Gt Yarmouth), to meet up with my daughter who was waiting for me on the farside of the river and lo! There’s this olde-worlde-looking ship. Hoping to get some good shots during our walk that day, I had my camera with me. Wow, luck! Not so lucky was the tide (which was out) thus the olde-worlde-looking ship sat low in the water and I couldn’t even see her hull from the quay. And moving round to the bridge, the light was in entirely the wrong direction. So this is not the best of shots.

TS Royalist moored at Gt Yarmouth

TS Royalist moored at Gt Yarmouth: photo taken 20th July 2018

TS Royalist isn’t as olde-worlde as it looks (it was built in 2014), and as its name might suggest, its a training ship used by the Sea Cadets. With up to 10 permanent crew, it provides real-environment training for up to 24 cadets.

This 130 ton is a 34-metre brig. But that’s about as much as I can tell you. I might live close enough to the quay to dip my toes in the river (though only when the tide is running high) but I know next to nothing about ships.

And where did I walk? Along the edge of Breydon Water, which lies just behind the town.

Breydon Water

A ‘smaller’ vessel sailing on Breydon Water: photo taken 20 July 2018

 

About crispina kemp

Spinner of Asaric and Mythic tales
This entry was posted in Mostly Micro, Photos and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

15 Responses to An Apprentice Ship

  1. Brian Bixby says:

    It’s interesting that several navies have used obsolete ships as training vessels. Makes some sense: you get a real feel for what wind, waves, and tide can do, which is probably much harder with today’s vessels (unless it’s the Titanic). I should go track down the actual account of the captain who sailed a recreation of a Viking ship from Norway to Chicago in 1893. He apparently fell in love with the ship.

    Liked by 2 people

    • crimsonprose says:

      He wouldn’t be the only one to experiment with older ships. A crew took a traditionally constructed Irish curragh (wood and hide) boat from Ireland to Iceland (or was it to Canada) about a decade or so ago.
      And TS Royalist might be an old design, but it was built just 4 years ago.
      In September we have several tall ships in port … and also a lot of tourists, so I don’t know whether I’ll get good shots of them.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Brian Bixby says:

        There’s a Viking vessel doing New England this summer, usually based in Mystic, Connecticut. A bit out of reach for me, given mass transit issues. And I have too much else on my plate.

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        Shame. Oh, if one pulled into Yarmouth. We do have them here. They’re found every so often, buried deep under the mud!
        I find often when I’m crossing the bridge, or walking along Breydon, I imagine what it must have been like, a whole fleet of longships …. not so good for those about to be axed.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Brian Bixby says:

        Or for them, if the port is prepared for them!

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        The port itself probably grew from a Viking trading site, not quite large enough to be called a Vik (that was Norwich). So I’m thinking the good folk of Yarmouth were probably mostly Viking by blood. But there were several abbeys that suffered from their axe-happy assaults.

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Joy Pixley says:

    What an exciting find on your walk! I don’t know much about ships either, but I would still enjoy seeing the “olde-worlde” ship, especially one that they’re really using, how interesting. Wikipedia tells me that the original TS Royalist was built in 1971 and this one was built in 2014 to replace her. She has a “traditional square-rigged brig layout” but is also equipped with diesel engines. And she’s not exactly authentic in other ways either: her hull is “high tensile steel, with her superstructure of glass reinforced plastic”. Even so, I can see the appeal of trying to learn the seas on this old-fashioned ship!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Dale says:

    What a fabulous find indeed, Crispina. I know zilch about ships myself but that doesn’t stop me from admiring their lines and shape… great for cadets to learn on, for sure.

    Liked by 1 person

    • crimsonprose says:

      This is one of the joys of living in a small port. Our river is too narrow, and too shallow, for the big ships, but we do get our share of the more interesting ships. And while I’ll daily groan of the mists and the cold in winter, there are advantages to living a hop and skip away from the river.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Dale says:

        I think as humans we are always finding something to bitch and moan about 😉
        But definitely lucky you. I am not too far from the St. Lawrence River – about 2 kms…

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        And the St Lawrence is a much bigger river than our homely Yare. My place is just at the back of the ‘Jane Austen’ looking building with the dormer windows. Not very clear on the photo, but it’s there. Though the frontage dates to 1755, my place was built in 1604, for a merchant. And hence no floorboards as insulation and, as I’ve said before, exceedingly leaky lead-glazed mullioned windows.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Dale says:

        But not where I am… between the south shore and the island of Montreal it’s no big whup. But it is nice to walk along.
        Oh wow… that is very cool, except for the lack of insulation and the leaky windows…

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        It’s worth the winter discomfort to be cool in this heatwave we’re having. This close to the sea, we should not have these temperatures. Hitting 30C before breakfast? Impossible.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Dale says:

        I can well imagine. We are suffering big time here, too. It’s actually been raining on and off all night and looks like more in the forecast – is it cooling off the joint? Nope. Hot and humid still.

        Like

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