Lacy Umbrellas

The many wildflowers of the umbellifer family that grace our English countryside are seldom easy to tell apart (except for hemlock and hogweed). Here … I think it’s Cow Parsley though it could be an early flowering Hedge Parsley. The lack of bracts suggests the former while the lack of red stems suggests the latter. Ho-hum.

Hedge or Cow Parsley

Cow Parsley (probably): Photo 7th June 2018

The delicate lace-like flowers are easily tossed in the wind, so I reckon it a triumph to achieve (almost) a full head in focus.

#2018picoftheweek: Out of Focus

About crispina kemp

Spinner of Asaric and Mythic tales
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21 Responses to Lacy Umbrellas

  1. gahlearner says:

    I like how you manage show the great beauty of wild flowers that are often overlooked in favour of the garden varieties.

    Liked by 1 person

    • crimsonprose says:

      I do love our British wayside flowers. I find it a challenge to take unusual shots, close-ups, to reveal the structure. And you’re right, these plants are most often ignored and overlooked in preference to the showy garden breeds.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. I love this. The out-of-focus parts really highlight the in-focus flower. Beautiful!

    I also love how you’re not quite sure if it’s cow parsley or not. I often have that trouble when I take pics of wildflowers. I try looking it up and do my best to identify it. But I’m no botanist!

    Liked by 1 person

    • crimsonprose says:

      Me neither; I just have a love of English wildflowers.
      While I’m pretty good at identifying them, sometimes I’ve absolutely no idea. Then the camera comes into play. A quick shot, and back home, uploaded to laptop, out comes the field guide and usually I find it. But sometimes the telling features are so small, or are out of shot, and I’m left still wondering.

      Liked by 2 people

  3. Dale says:

    So pretty… I could never name any of these…

    Liked by 1 person

    • crimsonprose says:

      Long years with a field-guide in hand. But there are still hundreds I can’t put a name to.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Dale says:

        I sometimes wish I could… other times I’m like… that’s a pretty purple flower šŸ˜‰

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        I have torn my hair out trying to identify a plant. Worse are fungi! I’m slowly becoming more relaxed on it. After all, my name isn’t Adam.

        Like

      • Dale says:

        Hahaha… I have a friend on FB who is always identifying my plant/tree pics… not that I remember any of them…

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        It’s been my passion since a young child (that and writing). I would take myself off into the local woods, across the meadows, alongside the river (more of a stream), through cornfields and wasteland and, Flower Fairy Books in hand, identify the flowers I found. In those far off, pre-conservation days I’d a flower and return home to press it. That wasn’t possible with all my finds. Crayfish and newts don’t easily press! šŸ™‚

        Liked by 1 person

      • Dale says:

        What a wonderful passion to have… mine’s cooking…
        And no… no pressing of little beasties!

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        Yea, well, I also collected skulls. Don’t accuse me of being a ghoul. OUr cat caught mice and shrews and things and took them into the tiny space between two garden sheds where, dry and on gravel, they defleshed. And every so often I collected them. I kept them in matchboxes. The last skull found was in a wet-woodland, covered in moss, of a squirrel. I also had a human thigh bone, complete with axe or sword wound, picked up off the beach at Dunwich, where coastal erosion had tumbled the medieval graveyard.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Dale says:

        That is kinda cool, truth be told….

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        A botanist-zoologist in the making. And then I want to art college. Humph. But then again, had I headed to Uni it would have more likely have been to take Medieval History. Or archaeology. Oh dear, typical Gemini, I.

        Like

      • Dale says:

        Ha ha! I’m 54 and still don’t know what I want to be when I grow up…

        Liked by 2 people

      • crimsonprose says:

        Who said I’d grown up? My eldest daughter sent a card a few years back that said, Now you are 5. On my 49th birthday I went clubbing with a bunch of students (my staff of the time) and danced them off the dance floor (Hands Up, Yay!)

        Liked by 1 person

      • Dale says:

        Haha! Yes!! That’s the best! Keeps us young…

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        Indeedy. Though I’m sure I aged some when I had CFS. Hell, I felt like ninety some days. But, I’m back to the boogie and the 10-mile hikes. If I stop for more than a few days my body starts to seize.

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        Oh, yea, and music and dance are two more passions. And walking. And being alive. Especially being alive. I guess when I stop being that the rest won’t matter.

        Liked by 1 person

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