Grandma’s Wedding Cake

image by darkeyed on pixabay

Ellie tore the vines and grasses from the chest, opened it and dug deep to the bottom,
To pull out a small package, wrapped in a plane leaf, darkly brittle.
Black, the cube of hard pudding.
Yellow, the icing, leached from the marzepane.
Her grandma’s wedding cake, her keepsake.


49 words written for Sammi’s Weekend Writing Prompt: Keepsake

About crispina kemp

Spinner of Asaric and Mythic tales
This entry was posted in Mostly Micro, On Writing and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

28 Responses to Grandma’s Wedding Cake

  1. Sadje says:

    Good one Crispina

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I love this, it’s so evocative with wonderful imagery.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Jen Goldie says:

    I like the rhythm. It reminds me of a song in Les Miserable. Especially the 3rd and 4th line.
    Very well done!
    And the visuals? Perfect! 👏👏👏👏👏🤗

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Dale says:

    I love this, Crispina.
    And I actually looked up “plane”, knowing full well I’d find a new use for the word from this day forward.

    Like

  5. Joy Pixley says:

    Great descriptions here. I know the tradition of saving wedding cake, but not like this — for so long, to the point where it’s completely inedible. Seems an odd keepsake, but then, no weirder than saving flowers, I suppose.

    Liked by 1 person

    • The tradition is to save the top teir of the wedding cake, to use at the christening 🙂 But not every marriage produces a child, and not all children live to be christened. Plus there are brides who are widowed within the year

      Liked by 1 person

      • Joy Pixley says:

        But then do you *eat* the cake, even if it’s several years old and not refrigerated? The tradition I’m more familiar with is to save the top tier in the freezer, and then married couple shares it on their first anniversary. But even then, it usually tastes awful — something very thematically wrong with that, hmm.

        Liked by 1 person

      • The tradition comes from a day before freezers. The cake (rich fruit, heavily laced with alcohol) would be wrapped in white tissue paper (to stop the icing going yellow) and then in brown wrapping paper. It then was stored in a cool dry place. I know for certain that in those conditions, the cake remains edible for at least 2 years. Which should see it through to the christening in the days before reliable contraception.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Joy Pixley says:

        Ah, it’s fruit cake! Yes, that makes more sense now. Although I can imagine that preserving the frosting is a bit more iffy. Maybe start with yellow frosting. 😉

        Liked by 1 person

      • It tends to turn yellow because of the marzipan. And the icing, as I remember it, tends to dry out and become almost like powder

        Liked by 1 person

      • Joy Pixley says:

        That does not sound tasty at all. I hope the new parents will be forgiven if they scrape the old icing off before the ceremonial eating-of-cake.

        Liked by 1 person

      • I think probably they do 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  6. Ben Naga says:

    Your words bring the scene and all its meaning to life. nicely done. 🙂

    Like

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