CCC#67: Boggarts and Trolls

Crimson’s Creative Challenge #67

There is a mill upon the fen
Beloved of troll, shunned by men
Never a grain was grinded there
But water raised from flood to mere
All the work of boggarts and trolls
But don’t let on, you’ll scare our souls

About crispina kemp

Spinner of Asaric and Mythic tales
This entry was posted in Crimson's Creative Challenge, Photos, Poems (Some Silly) and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

51 Responses to CCC#67: Boggarts and Trolls

  1. Sadje says:

    Good one! Sounds like a place one should visit.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Violet Lentz says:

    Actually, I think happening upon a troll might make for an interesting afternoon….

    Liked by 2 people

  3. I love this! I went with what my feelings were when I first saw this picture. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Deborah says:

    Picture and poem beautiful! You brought life to it with your gift of rhyme! 🙂 ❤

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Nice. It runs like a local nursery rhyme.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. I LOVE this poem and read it before I viewed the photograph. So I actually thought the photo was made up, because of course its one of a troll mill. How cool of you to find it.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Dale says:

    Wonderful photo and love the rhyme! Trolls are not so bad after all, are they?

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Lynn Love says:

    Oh, how I love the word boggart! First came across it reading Wolf Hall. Do you know the derivation? And I love your little wander into the marshes, too. We’ve discussed before how these in-between places are so fascinating, a cross roads for the other world. No doubt why your boggarts and trolls are attracted to the place.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I wish I could give you an erudite story of the origins of boggart. Alas, I chased its origins a few years back only to tie myself into knots. Indo-European, probably; it’s found in several forms in several European languages, in folklore. It is the origin of Boggieman, and the reason we play peek-a-boo with toddlers. And perhaps that’s all there is to it… boo! a fright, and a boggart is something that gives us a fright.
      That’s the best I could come up with.
      And yes, that mill is ideally placed to attract such otherworld entities… or at least the story of them. Although as far as recorded is concerned, it would more likely be Old Shuck… the huge black dog that prowled the waterways, found wherever there were Danes… and there were many of those around here

      Liked by 1 person

      • Lynn Love says:

        Interesting, that link with the bogey man. Makes sense of course. And peek a boo, with the patent as the boggart -there has to be a story there 😊. I’ve not read much about old shuck though I’m guessing that where Conan Doyle took the idea of the hound of the Baskerville’s. And back when wolves and wild dogs were viable threats to personal safety, I can see why these stories came about

        Liked by 1 person

      • I love getting into all that. But it’s often surprising how recent the first mentions… but then that’s mentions in print…. say no more

        Like

      • Lynn Love says:

        Yes, mentions in print could be so different to oral familiarity. Shakespeare is credited with inventing many expressions but surely the audiences must have been familiar with some of them or they wouldn’t understand his meaning. Perhaps he was just good at taking what the man in the street said and putting it into his plays

        Liked by 1 person

      • Indeed, I can’t imagine an audience being enthralled when the play is peppered with words they don’t understand. I have Lauren asking me sometimes, Is this one of your made-up words? But my words always conform to structural rules.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Lynn Love says:

        That’s when made up words work the best, when there’s a resonance for the reader to an existing word. It’s why I admired George RR Martin’s character names in GoT – many echoed names we’re familiar with but with a slight twist

        Like

      • And that’s why, when I do make up words, I keep them to the recognised grammatical rules.
        But we’re making up words all the time. Changing the part of speech so a verb becomes a noun, or a noun a verb. I remember saying to someone about being vegetabilized, and even moleculized. They knew what I meant.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Lynn Love says:

        So true! I remember the first time I heard ‘incentivised’ I didn’t like it 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • I don’t often like American pronounciation. The accent is entirely in the wrong place. Trouble is, I’ve watched so many *exports* … not so much movies or even documentaries but several of the universities (Harvard, Yale etc) put out their lectures to YouTube, and I so enjoy them. But then I don’t know if I’m picking up the American pronounciations of words I’d only read until then.

        Like

      • Lynn Love says:

        American English is pretty widespread, it’s true. There are some examples I’ll accept – but not aluminum 😄

        Liked by 1 person

      • The one my daughter and I always remark on. How do they manage to work that pronounciation?

        Liked by 1 person

      • Lynn Love says:

        Or ‘erbs rather than herbs? What have they got against that poor letter H? I wrote a short story set in the States a while back and asked an American blogger friend to look it over for me, look at the dialogue particularly. He said American English is just lazier than English English. Not sure I entirely agree – we’re pretty damn lazy in our pronunciation! – but I kind of get what he means

        Like

      • I can see that to a degree… except we omit the centre part of a word where the Americans will pronounce it. And herb flows so much easier than ‘erb.

        Liked by 1 person

  9. Pingback: Crimson's Creative Challenge #67: Twilight at Bicker's Mill – Word Shamble

  10. Indira says:

    It didn’t scare your soul though, you took all the trouble to get the photograph. Nice shot.

    Liked by 1 person

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