Two Fine Horses

Hello, says these two fine horses: 4 April 2019

If you count legs you’ll discover there’s one hiding. But these two wouldn’t allow the third one to snuffle his snout in.

So … Hello, as per the title in Maria’s photo challenge

For details of #2019picoftheweek challenge see MariaAntonia

We found these two (three, but the third can’t be seen) when walking a country lane that led to …

4th April 2019

I was a tad worried about those loose horses with their low flying balls. Thank heavens there wasn’t a match that day!

About crispina kemp

Spinner of Asaric and Mythic tales
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32 Responses to Two Fine Horses

  1. Violet Lentz says:

    We have 20 or so horses here on the property. They are huge draft horses and quite beautiful as are these two polo players…

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Dale says:

    Lovely. Horses are such beautiful animals.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Jen Goldie says:

    There’s something wonderful about horses. I’m not a rider but I was challenged once to ride one. It took off and fortunately I stayed on. A friend,of mine had a Mustang named Chiffon. One on visit I asked if I could Brush her. I snuggled into her side and got to brushing. When I thought to brush her other side, I stepped back and indicated I wanted her to turn around. I;m still amazed that she just looked at me and did it. They have such soulful eyes.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. This is great! Poor third horse, though… not being allowed to say hello…

    (I too would be worried about those loose horses. Oh my!)

    Liked by 1 person

    • crimsonprose says:

      There was no polo match that day. And we sat on a bench found on the sidelines to eat our lunhc. Safely.
      The third horse, whose legs can just be seen, was smaller than the other two, perhpas by as much as two hands, black with a white star. I did catch him in a shot, but the three together weren’t pleasingly composed.

      Like

  5. The Vikings had an answer for that problem

    Liked by 2 people

  6. Nice horsies! I’ve never even tried to play polo – have you done it? Is it fun?

    Liked by 1 person

    • crimsonprose says:

      I always think of it as a game for the rich. The cost of those horses! And to hear the plums in the tight-mouthed spectators … but maybe that’s only a stereotype. I like to say that football began with the Celts, kicking about with the heads of slain enemies. Maybe the same can be said of this sport, but with peoples some place East. Mongolia, Siberia. Maybe it was begun by Kubla Khan. ๐Ÿ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

      • I like the idea of riding fabulous horses in Xanadu, so Kubla Khan sounds like a plan!

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        Well, I’ve checked it out and apparently Polo was first played in Persia, c.C6th BCE, as a form of military training. C6th. That would be before Xerxes, wouldn’t it. Just think. Alexander could have played it with his men.
        But I rather prefer the idea of Kubla Khan. ๐Ÿ™‚

        Liked by 1 person

      • Brian Bixby says:

        And then there is elephant polo . . .

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        Is there? Or is this another of your wind-ups? I mean, I can imagine it. But I can imagine it is a very slow moving game. As to their low flying balls … nasty

        Liked by 1 person

      • Brian Bixby says:

        There is. I stumbled into it while doing some ancestry research. The current Campbell Duke of Argyll is a player and prominent supporter.

        Like

      • crimsonprose says:

        I seriously thought it a wind-up. But I’ve googled it, and unless you’ve paid google to back you up on this, it’s true. Wow. Thank you for extending my education. It was seriously lacking without this lastest snippet of information. Bloody Campbells. Please excuse my Lamont genes, they do seek expression when they encounter that name!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Brian Bixby says:

        Hadn’t heard of it until earlier this year, myself. My uncle had thought we were Breadalbane Campbells, but the family tree traces toward Argyll territory, so I went to look up the duke. Surprise!

        Just recently finished reading Kishlansky’s political history of 17th century Britain. Put Glencoe in a wider perspective. Need to track down the book he references on the subject.

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        I did not the word Argyl. Which is, of course, the ancestral home of the Lamonts (Dunoon to be exact.) Humph. But we have agreed to call a truce. So I shan’t hurl abuse at you.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Brian Bixby says:

        I think you’re trying to avoid explicitly saying that some of my ancestors were genocidal maniacs. It’s true. I hope it is not an inherited trait.

        Like

      • crimsonprose says:

        While it’s true your ancestors did massacre mine … yet I have to admit that, while the Lamonts claimed Irish descent, DNA and more recent research shows them to have been Vikings. And while there were some nice, civilised Vikings, I doubt my ancestors were any better than yours. ๐Ÿ™‚

        Liked by 1 person

  7. Iโ€™m always on the lookout for low flying balls ๐Ÿ˜

    Liked by 1 person

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