And Did Those Feet

dry wash lane

Crimson’s Creative Challenge

First were the Britons’ iron-clad chariot wheel-rims rattling as they raced along.

Then arrived slick-skinned hard-nailed southern sandals
in haste to decimate the rebel clans.

Soft-soled boots of Baltic seal-skin followed, peaceful in their homestead aims.

All disturbed by the pony-mounted army, Viking swords in hand.

But peace returned—if briefly—on the grant to one of land.

Now feet did mingle, native, immigrant, subject to the Zeelandic king.

Until … battle-hardened foreign knights on heavy-footed steeds rode in.

Next descended the Black Leveller, clad in Death’s bubonic boils;
opened wool-runs to yeomen farmers, encouraged weavers from the Kemp-lands.

I could go on …

But how, you ask, came this Wash Lane to be so name?
From the gush of clear filtered field-waters after heavy rain.


Wordcount 128
Written for Crimson’s Creative Challenge

This is the true history, and reason for its name.

About crispina kemp

Spinner of Asaric and Mythic tales
This entry was posted in Crimson's Creative Challenge, History, Poems (Some Silly) and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

62 Responses to And Did Those Feet

  1. Violet Lentz says:

    Delicious history I have come to expect and a perfect explanation to the name Wash.. brilliant on every level!

    Liked by 1 person

    • crimsonprose says:

      I thank you, Violet.
      Finding the explanation involved an interesting journey through C18th and C19th writings on contempory farming methods. It was a time of great changes in farming, and my beloved Norfolk led the way. A certain MP took credit, him and his mate, but in fact Coke and Townsend merely publicised the work being donw by Dutch immigrants.

      Liked by 2 people

  2. What a sweet coincidence that I was penning a poem on the picture about marching armies on an old path broken by the gavel of time and determined men! You wrote it far more beautifully and it was a delight to read it.

    Liked by 1 person

    • crimsonprose says:

      I thank you.
      I also wrote it last Friday. Maybe you picked up on my thoughts, fliltered across the nous-sphere. 🙂

      Like

      • Oh? 😄 Maybe so! Though I saw it just today but maybe your thoughts imprinted on the image when you first wrote the poem and when I saw it, they mind-melded with mine to guide my creativity! 😂

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        My thought entirely. I tend to sort out a week’s posts and upload them all on one day, then schefule as appropriote. In the past I’ve had so much problem with connectivity, that I developed the habit to avoid missing deadlines.

        Like

      • That’s a good habit! I can relate with internet connectivity problems. I am trying to complete my assignments before deadlines just so to avoid any connectivity mishaps. But this week I am lagging behind. So I have been posting old work now days. Hopefully, one of these days I’ll get a spark of creativity to write some new poems. 😊

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        Take some time out. If only if an evening, or an afternoon. Go for a walk. It works with me.

        Liked by 1 person

      • You are absolutely right. I’ll do that as soon as I can! A bit down in the dumps lately because of my disorder, but things will get better soon and I’ll have more time to spare and take a break. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        I can feel for you there. 13 years of CFS/ME, severe, then to discover a change in diet puts me back on my feet. But, others with debilitating conditions are not so fortunate.

        Liked by 1 person

      • I know you can and I, too, can absolutely relate with the struggles of CFS. For years chronic fatigue was one of my most acute symptoms and I have seen bad days since it subsided but damn, that almost broke me. I am so glad you found a way to manage your illness. I have known many who still struggle every moment of every single day and are greeted with apathy because it doesn’t show on their face how much they are suffering. I have so much respect for your strength and I am sure you’ll keep on channeling the warrior in you while inspiring others to keep fighting their own invisible monsters along the way. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        I know what you mean: there’s no broken leg or arm in a sling, therefore everything must be all right. At my worst I couldn’t go out to shop, taxi there, taxi back, was the only way. But that’s physical. Worse was the mental aspects. But I don’t need to telll you. You know what I’m saying. Only those who have been there …
        And I like that you call me a warrior. Yea, maybe. I am a fighter and have been since early childhood. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • Oh, you most definitely are one! Tough times have a way of molding a warrior out of us, whether we like it or not, because the alternative is an abyss we all want to avoid. It’s been great talking to you.

        Liked by 1 person

  3. Love the history behind this. Nice! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Jen Goldie says:

    Wonderful and sad at the same time. Beautiful imagery. The explanation adds so much more to the task at hand. Thanks Crispina. 🙂🌼

    Liked by 1 person

    • crimsonprose says:

      Pleasure. It was written from the heart … or maybe from my genes. Some of the feet belonged to my paternal ancestors.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Jen Goldie says:

        Wow I could tell it was heartfelt. I have distant cousins (I think) in Kent (Kennington Ashford Kent) I was invited years ago. Apparently one of them played the organ at the Cathedral. I think their name was/is Kemp. My father’s mother.

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        Coincidences, hey. I know there’s a big gathering of Kemps in Kent. I’m not sure they’re related. There was an Archbishop of Canturbury by name of Kemp, so maybe your kin are related to him?
        I found a history of the ‘family’ written at the turn of the last centurry, and this chap was trying to link the various assumed branches. and trying to explain the name.
        Thing is, there’s a region in Germany called the Kempen, and it’s possible that is one source of the surname. England received gluts of Calvin immigrants from the area, mostly weavers. My own family can trace back to East Harling (original centre of linen weaving) to a marriage with the Mainwarings of Harling way back in mid-C12th. So, not Calvinists. I suspect, but cannot prove, they arrived as mercenaries in King Stephen’s army. The time is right for it.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Jen Goldie says:

        Wow! My father’s Mother was “Alice Kemp” she married my grandfather “Alexander Goldie” of Lochwenoch? Scotland, outside of Glasgow. I have a picture of my grandfather Goldie with the Kemp brothers, all in uniform. Don’t we wish we’d done things we refused to do. Yes Canterbury, he played the organ there. I’ll try emailing the photo of the Kemp boys and my grandad. Wow! 😊💜

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        And, if I remember from researches done, the surnmane Goldie is possibly Flemish. Low Countries. Weavers. An obvious partner for a Kemp.
        The Book I was saying, I found on Google Books, if you’re interested:
        A General History of the Kemp and Kempe Families of Great Britain and Her Colonies by Fred. Hitchin Kemp. (Coildn’t find the publication date on it). It’s a scanned book, put out as pdf. And I wold disagree with several of his theories, and I wouldn’t be alone. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • Jen Goldie says:

        I sent a photo via e-mail. My Aunt Goldie’s seem to think there was a French connection and they fled during the Reformation. I’m a little/lot uninformed in the history department LOL

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        And she would be right. Old Flanders, as in Flemiings, is now the north-eastern fring of France. Besides which people really didn’t stay put in those days; they were greater wanderers than we are. Loads of Calvinists and Huguemots (read Protestants) fled both France and Netherlands during the Reformations. There wasn’t such a things as religious freedom.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Jen Goldie says:

        I love this. I have an old spirit Crispina and she’s dancing around LOL

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        Enjoy it, my fellow name-sharer.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Jen Goldie says:

        I will Cuz! LOL

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        Believe me, I am smiling. I just don’t express it so freely. Courtesy of the ‘other’ line. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  5. Jen Goldie says:

    Wonderful title too. Iove it!

    Liked by 2 people

  6. Wash lane, very cool name. Interesting post too!

    Like

  7. Nice – the passage of time and the ancient qualities of the road do have some magic to them!

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Michael says:

    I did enjoy the method you used to explain the image. Places had names that so reflected the physical characteristics.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Dale says:

    I love how you show who has used the path over time.
    You are the queen of history! And, you make it interesting to read!

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Wow, impressive history–and I love your reveal at the end, the name of the lane 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  11. You manage to cover so much history – and so many feet – in so few lines. (Do you think I included enough so’s in that sentence?!) Marvellous. I always enjoy reading your response to your prompts because of the history you manage to weave through it…It always engaging and entertaining 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.