Blue-petalled

This delicate blue-petalled (perennial) cornflower sparkled star-like from the hedgerow, calling to me, ‘Please take my pic’.

Perenniel Cornflower

Perennial Cornflower: Photo 30th May 2018

Although a ‘garden escapee’, the Perennial Cornflower has become a naturalised wayside flower, though far from common.

About crispina kemp

Spinner of Asaric and Mythic tales
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20 Responses to Blue-petalled

  1. Judy says:

    I like that flower…..kind of spiny looking.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. Joy Pixley says:

    What an odd and interesting flower! I don’t think I’ve ever see that before, thanks for sharing!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Dale says:

    So very pretty, Crispina!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. gahlearner says:

    Cornflower blue is the prettiest of blues, I think. Do you also have the wild variety that grows in corn fields?

    Liked by 1 person

    • crimsonprose says:

      Oddly, I seldom see the wild (annual) variety. I think that’s mostly due to it growing on freshly turned soil, and most of the UK farmers are heavy-handed on herbicides. There are, however, some smaller farms around Gt Yarmouth which specialise in organic farming. And yes, on their field margins I have seen the wild cornflowers growing. And that’s always a delight. The other field flower that’s suffered due to chemical farming is the field pansy. It’s so small it’s easy to overlook, but I’m always delighted to find it.

      Liked by 1 person

      • gahlearner says:

        Yeah, they’ve been almost completely gone here until, about 25 years ago, there was money from the government for farmers to leave one meter on the edge of the field untreated. That brought back a lot of pretty flowers but as soon as the program ran out a few years ago, they went back to spraying every centimeter, regardless of wild plants or insects and it’s a rare find again to see corn flowers, chamomile or poppies in the field. 😦

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        I guess I’m lucky to live in an area of lots of small farms. Being small, there’s big profit in supplying the organic market. And I can vouch for their organic methods having trodden across a field shortly after ‘muck spreading’, Phew!
        BTW, this Thursday, not only were the hedges everywhere thick with wild roses, but I also came upon a bee orchid! The first ever I’ve found.

        Liked by 1 person

      • gahlearner says:

        Oh wonderful. We have some areas where orchids can be found, too. But I live in a suburb surrounded by agriculture that focuses on grain, asparagus, corn (for a biogas plant) and strawberries. Everything is under plastic to force-grow the stuff, everything lacks aroma… then, in the season, they plow it under because everyone can sell it cheap now. It’s a topic I could go on about forever…

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        Yea, fully understand. It’s a long time now since I laid down in front of a plough, but I did use to be one of those Green Protestors.

        Liked by 1 person

      • gahlearner says:

        I worked in the field of organic control… there was so much promise, and lately it all seems to go down the drain. But I have been ‘out of it’ for many years now.

        Like

      • crimsonprose says:

        I was a member of the then Ecology Party (late 1970s/early 1980s) but became disillusioned when I received a circular printed on ordinary paper, asking for my vote on whether the party should use recycled paper in future. Oh, I still waved my flag, but I was no longer officially involved.

        Liked by 1 person

      • gahlearner says:

        LOL, yeah. It took me a long time (I’m naive, can’t help it) to be disillusioned but by now I accept that good intentions are very hard to live up to. As long as someone’s really trying, I’m content.

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        And for that I moan about incipient bureaucracy I have to say, all our protests did show results. It’s just we tend now to take them for granted. Take recycling, for example.

        Liked by 1 person

      • gahlearner says:

        That’s true. Things are moving into the right direction. Question is if they are moving fast enough…

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        Move too fast there’s a danger of it becoming a revolution. Problem with revolutions they tend to turn 360 degrees. Better by far to gently nudge, a few degrees at a time. Things are chugging on nicely. They just needed a brisk kick-start.

        Liked by 1 person

      • gahlearner says:

        That’s true. I was thinking of climate change, though. Gentle nudging led to nothing and it’s already very late in the game.

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        I’m still confused over that. Do we have global warming? Or was that a short-lived scare and now we’re heading for another mini Ice-Age? Seems climatologists can’t make up their minds.

        Like

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