Crimson’s Creative Challenge #17

A Bridge 3 Far cp

#CCC17

Welcome to my weekly challenge—open to all—just for FUN, FUN, FUN

Here’s how it works:

Every Wednesday I post a photo (this week it’s that one above.)
You respond with something CREATIVE

Here are some suggestions:

  • An answering photo
  • A cartoon
  • A joke
  • A caption
  • An anecdote
  • A short story (flash fiction)
  • A poem
  • A newly minted proverb, adage or saying
  • An essay
  • A song—the lyrics or the performance

You have plenty of scope and only two criteria:

  • Your creative offering is indeed yours
  • Your writing is kept to 150 words or less

If you post a link in the comments section of this post I’ll be able to find it
If you include Crimson’s Creative Challenge as a heading, WP Search will find it (theory)
If you tag it #CCC others should be able to find it by ‘Searching’ in the WP Reader (fingers crossed)

Here’s wishing you inspirational explosions. And FUN.

Details of the photo are given, if relevant, below this line


Marriotts Way follows a former railway track from Norwich centre to Reepham. At Reepham it curls around and hitches to another former railway track to roll on to Aylsham. 25 miles in all. And as you can imagine, 25 miles involves a lot of bridges. This one crosses the Wensum between Costessey and Drayton.

About crispina kemp

Spinner of Asaric and Mythic tales
This entry was posted in Crimson's Creative Challenge and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

84 Responses to Crimson’s Creative Challenge #17

  1. Violet Lentz says:

    Wonder where this bridge will lead….

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Brian Bixby says:

    Above is “The Bridge on the River Wensum,” famous from the movie of that name. The bridge was first constructed by Norfolk serfs in the year 1380, which explains why they rose up in the Peasants’ Revolt the following year. It is said 8 serfs (5 men, 2 women, one child) were hanged from the bridge as the revolt as put down.

    Rebuilt several times, the bridge fell in 1578, destroyed by conspirators against Queen Elizabeth as part of the Islington plot. In legend, the witch of Islington felled the bridge by sacrificing a unicorn, which given the witch’s known promiscuity is dubious.

    The bridge was still out in 1581 when Queen Elizabeth arrived at the crossing. Sir Walter Raleigh threw down his cloak so she could walk dry-shod across the river. However, Raleigh’s cloak was immediately washed downstream, and he had to hunt up a yeoman’s coracle to convey the queen across. It is said the unavoidable intimacy of being together in such a small boat is how Raleigh curried the queen’s favor.

    Liked by 4 people

    • crimsonprose says:

      Brilliant, Brian. Though I am beginning to wonder about your medication. 🙂
      And a certain leeway is allowed with a promot (creative licence) so I shan’t point out the more modern nature of this bridge, more suited to one of the Georges than to Queen Liz. 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

      • Brian Bixby says:

        I’d already overrun your 150 word limit, else I’d have continued through the bridge’s many rebuilds. Or maybe not. It’s far, far too easy to belabor humor.

        Liked by 2 people

      • crimsonprose says:

        I am resisting, because I’m such nice person, and because you’ve always been such a good friend, the temptation to say, But, Brian, you do it so well. Oops, fingers slipped.
        Please don’t take offence. It’s done in the spirit of humour, you know. 🙂

        Liked by 2 people

      • Brian Bixby says:

        Oh, I understand. You don’t want to offend me so I won’t tell them about . . . OK, people, listen up. In 1857, the bridge was being rebuilt to carry a railroad. One of the laborers on the project was an ancestor of Crispina’s. The Queen came to visit. Now, she was in mourning, the Prince Consort having died less than a year before. Crispina’s ancestor, whose name, improbably, was Bigod, was a bit of a clown and a jokester, and by telling some joke about his name, he actually got the queen to laugh.

        Well, this was a national crisis. It could not become known that the queen had laughed. So that night, Bigod was quietly seized from another man’s wife’s bed, drowned in the Wensum, and buried under one of the bridge’s piles that was under construction.

        Queen Victoria never forgave Bigod. But she could never forget what she’d ordered done, either. And, Bigod had actually been kind of sexy, standing there sweating, stripped to the waist. So the Queen stayed in mourning for the rest of her life, not in honor of her dead husband, but for Bigod. And she never smiled again.

        Liked by 4 people

      • crimsonprose says:

        Brian …. now I can’t stop laughing. Brilliantly done. 🙂 🙂 🙂

        Liked by 2 people

    • Dale says:

      It is getting to the point that I cannot wait for whatever exchange that happens betwixt you two!

      Liked by 2 people

      • crimsonprose says:

        Oh, this has been going on since … 2012? Or was it 2013. I’d miss him if he wasn’t there., making comments in some humorous, dry, quirky way. 🙂

        Liked by 2 people

      • Dale says:

        Love it. He’s a hoot as are you. Your repartee is fun to observe.🙂

        Liked by 2 people

      • crimsonprose says:

        It gets a tad riskee at times. Double entrendres.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Dale says:

        Yes! Which is why it is so great!

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        You should read his comment the first time I posted fungi. Though my own fault, describing them as glistening purple helmets!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Dale says:

        Oh dear… I can so imagine where that went! Maybe I’ll go snooping…

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        Try the post titled Wood-Rotters, posted 23/10/2016

        Like

      • Brian Bixby says:

        2012, probably. I started writing on my fiction blog in August, and I’m pretty sure we connected before the end of the year.

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        I started CP in November 2012. You were amongst my first followers. I’ve just tried to check it, but wretched site won’t allow me to scroll back so far.
        You have been faithful. even when I’ve posted crap. And what would I do without at least one belly laugh a week from you?

        Liked by 1 person

      • Brian Bixby says:

        I have a comment from you dated December 9, 2012, on a post tat had gone up November 23. What goes around comes around: it was on the Campbells and the Lamonts!

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        Yes! You’ve just scored a belly-laugh. In fact, I choked. And if I remember, you had recently returned from Scotland, with the discovery that’s it’s not always wise to claim yourself a Campbell.
        Indeed not. Your lot killed my lot. Nay, massacred, I believe the story tells it. Though apparently not entirely else there’d be no Lamonts today to tell you. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • Brian Bixby says:

        Aye, it was the trip where I stayed at a b&b on Skye run by a MacDonald. We massacred a few of them, too. Didn’t finish that job, either.

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        That’s not a score you should be proud of, If you’re goning to massacre it should be fully done. Unless, of course, we’re talking now.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Brian Bixby says:

        Fortunately, the current clan chief is more interested in elephant polo than in finishing off the Lamonts. Although, the elephants could come in handy.

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        Death and destruction as wrought by Campbell-bred elephants. Nasty. And now you’re reclaiming your heritage, any news of the ancestral seat? Perhaps a wee crag in a highland glen? Or do you intend to lay claim to Dunoon. I understand it’s doing quite nicely now as a quiet-ish resort for Glaswegians.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Brian Bixby says:

        LOL. The furthest I was able to trace my line back in the Scottish records online was to a village called Lochgoilhead, which not surprisingly is at the head of Loch Goil, deep in national park (Loch Lomond and the Trossachs) lands. Don’t think I’m going to be moving in.

        I did actually check to see if I was eligible for U.K. citizenship when I was looking up all the possibilities. The answer was “no,” but weirdly if I were younger the answer could have been “yes.” Jut have to wait for Scotland to secede from the U.K. and see what they do.

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        How many citizenships do you want? Come on, there has to be a scam here. Ah, is it so you can Old Age Pension in all these countries? My greataunt was accused of that by her sisters when she returned from Canada, just in time to claim. Though she’d also been recently widowed, which I’d say was more the reason for her return.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Brian Bixby says:

        Oh, yea, checked out Canada, too. It’s conceivably possible I WAS eligible for Canadian citizenship for a few years back in the last century; the law then was complicated. But no longer.

        And there I run out. You have to go back to ancestors before 1300 before any other countries are in play.

        By the way, you can BUY citizenship in several countries by making an investment in them. Some Caribbean nations require but $100,000. Malta will give you an EU passport for about half a million euros. Not having that kind of cash stuffed in a cookie tin in my kitchen, there I stop my quest for citizenships.

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        That’s just as well. Otherwise you’d invest in them all and become ‘world citizen’. Which, I suppose, these days is what we all are.

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        Found it. You clicked to follow on 7th December 2012; my 6th follower.
        I just had to scroll slowly, but I don’t do anything slowly.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Brian Bixby says:

        Glad you found it; I could not do the same, because for some reason you accidentally unfollowed me at one point.

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        Yea, I know. I clicked the wrong button somewhere along the way. I think it was during my asent-minded days of CFS. I have apologised. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • Brian Bixby says:

        And now my turn to apologize for my ancestors killing off the relatives of your ancestors.

        Trust me, this is a sincere apology.

        No, I don’t mean anything at all by having an elephant to hand.

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        I’m keeping a wary eye on the Elley. It starts tramping across the Atlantic, I’m getting my brother’s elephant gun. Though, seems more likely it’ll come be Jumbo. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

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  5. Ramyani Bhattacharya says:

    Heyyy, so this is my story. I hope you like it! 😃
    https://panacheblogs.wordpress.com/2019/03/06/together-at-last/

    Liked by 1 person

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  10. A prime example of the widely held misconception of the ignorance and superstition of Northern folk this week at http://bobfairfield.org/2019/03/07/crimsons-creative-challenge-17/

    Liked by 2 people

  11. syncwithdeep says:

    Thanks for the prompt.. Came across this prompt in a bloggers post.. Here is my take,
    https://syncwithdeep.wordpress.com/2019/03/07/bridging-the-gaps/

    Liked by 2 people

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  17. Violet Lentz says:

    https://violetslentz.home.blog/2019/03/10/under-the-bridge/

    Lovely photo and thought-provoking prompt. Thank you, Crispina!

    Liked by 1 person

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  20. Great photo. A bridge is always inspiring, and this one was particularly useful in my serial. I’m so enjoying this challenge, Crispina 😀

    Liked by 1 person

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