Across Country Leading

Not the first photo I’ve posted that features pylons—I do confess to a perverse passion for them. Neither was the photo recently taken. But …

leading lines

The line of pylons is greatly compressed, by use of f16 stop: 31st May 2017

… I can’t imagine a photo more suited to #2019picoftheweek challenge title: Leading Lines

There’s a total of 8 pylons in this shot.


For details of #2019picoftheweek challenge  see MariaAntonia

About crispina kemp

Spinner of Asaric and Mythic tales
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24 Responses to Across Country Leading

  1. Violet Lentz says:

    Perfect fit for the prompt. The incidences of pylons is dwindling here in the US as utility lines are often buried.

    Liked by 1 person

    • crimsonprose says:

      Well here, there are a group of villages connected by an excellent web of footpaths, and nearly every one of them passes under these lines. They crackle, did you know that. An odd sound. Worse in misty or damp weather. And cattle in the fields beneath them tend to stay away from them.
      But something of them. No puns intended, but there’s something … powerful about that tall triangular structure.

      Like

  2. Judy says:

    This is a great shot on many levels..great composition of the line of pylons.. I especially love the dark greens in the foreground and those light greens in the center field. It’s so visually beautiful. Good job!

    Liked by 2 people

  3. There is something pleasing to the eye about these structures. Maybe it’s all the lines and angles. Nice shot!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Although the world might be more scenic without them, I do agree they have a stark grace, especially when they’re surrounded by nature.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Dale says:

    I look at these and all I can think of is the lines and lines of ours, bent over during the ice storm of ’98!
    Great shot!

    Liked by 1 person

    • crimsonprose says:

      I heard something about that ice-storm the other day. Is that the one that took out communications? I just can’t imagine that happening here.
      And I thank you for your appreciative comment. And now … though it’s early for you, my hard-worked eyes are insisting I close down for the night. Bo-hho, cos I’ve still got the energy. No good having energy if everything turns to a blur. 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Like

      • Dale says:

        It was 20 years ago from Jan 5-10. We were without power for 3 weeks.

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        Three weeks! Heck, how did you cope? I pace the floors if power id off for 12 hours.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Dale says:

        Thankfully, my sister and I (both very pregnant) hung out at HER place for that time. She was in an area that was not affected for more than 24 hours.

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        That was fortunate for you that you could. I don’t know what I’d do. I’ll all electric. Go to my daughter’s across the river; at least she has heat and cooking on gas. But she hasn’t much room. I’d have to take loads of pens and paper, and renew my acquaintance with the library!

        Liked by 2 people

      • Dale says:

        It wasn’t an option, Crispina. It was -10C and below. We could not stay in our house. The water froze in the cats’ water bowl!

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        But that’s what I’m saying, what would you have done if you hadn’t had a sister, or other family to go to? We take electricity so much for granted. I hate that I’m dependant on it. Time was I had a fireplace, could have an open fire. Yikes. But you survived it. I think in England we’re too soft, we have things too easy. And where I live in East Anglia, apart from coastal erosion and the occasional sea-surge, it’s like we live in God’s Bleesed Land. I give thanks. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • Dale says:

        It would have been intolerable. The shelters were filled to over-flowing and looked like they were horrid conditions… I am blessed I had somewhere to go. But all sorts of neighbours showed their generosity so I’m sure we would have figured something out.

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        Yea, I guess when the shit happens, the people realise they live in a community and they begin to help one another. Shame shit has to happen first. But then, under normal conditions that’s called being nosy and interfering. Can’t win.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Dale says:

        Also where you see who is not so much your friends… people’s true colours come out in times of trouble. And yes, shame shit has to happen…

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        Indeed, No disagreement there.

        Liked by 1 person

  6. Lovely photo. I also must admit a liking for pylons. I can’t explain it, but they make for very interesting photos. And I love how the pylons in your photo start to blend together the further away they get 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

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