We, the Survivors

It’s hardly possible these days to turn on the news without hearing of some recent catastrophe: tsunami, earthquake, volcano, tornadoes, hurricanes (are they the same thing?) rising sea-levels, floods, landslides . . .  take your pick. And if it isn’t our planet turning violent upon us, it’s we humans practicing (what an awful phrase) atrocities upon each other.

But there’s nothing new in it. Violent death has always been with us as a species, since before we evolved to be that species. And it’s an aching truism that it takes a human to be inhumane. We can, of course, excuse the planet; it doesn’t really intend to harm us, it just has its moments (much like we humans). Add to all that the most effective killer known to Mankind—viruses, microbes, GERMS! Truly, it’s a wonder we humans have survived this long.

And that’s the crux of this post. WE ARE THE SURVIVORS.

There isn’t one of us alive today whose ancestors didn’t survive wars, racial eradication, various suppressions—slavery . . . plagues . . .  the Black Death! . . . invasions, famines, droughts . . . the Vikings! Ha, the Romans, too! Flu’ epidemics, typhus, the Yellow Plague . . . not to mention every kind of weather the planet could throw at us. Oh, yea, and the eruption (more than once) of Hekla, in Iceland, which brought a nuclear winter (at least the northern hemisphere) even within recorded history (not to mention the really big volcanoes that scalded our species and threatened extinction before we barely could walk). I could list every known catastrophe but there isn’t the need.

Individually we suffer, and die. But as a species we’re pretty resilient. And that is something we ought to celebrate . . . while stretching out a helping hand.

 

About crispina kemp

Spinner of Asaric and Mythic tales
This entry was posted in Thoughts and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

8 Responses to We, the Survivors

  1. Brian Bixby says:

    You left out plagues of locusts and the remake of “The Wicker Man.” 😉

    Like

    • crimsonprose says:

      Gosh, how remiss. And I can’t really pinpoint what sparked the thought behind the post. Reading of the Black Plague, or the Viking attacks, of the horrendous living standards of the agricultural workers in Georgian (more even than Victorian) England. It all combines. But there’s also reading the outcome of recent genetic studies. (e.g. it’s now decided there was no Viking settlement in Normandy. DNA evidence is lacking! Yea, like, they may not have had the immunity to survive the plagues, unlike those who had mixed with the Med-type Romans etc etc etc.)

      Liked by 1 person

      • Brian Bixby says:

        One of my students was also bringing up surprising DNA facts which apparently settled a related question, whether the Vikings dominated or supplanted the native Picts in the Scottish islands. Apparently they were a dominant minority.

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        I have become somewhat suspect of DNA studies, and no only for the reason previously said. What, they sample a mere 50 people per town out of a population of 50,000 and call that a valid exercise? Until everyone is sampled, no firm conclusions can be found. I have spoken! So there.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Brian Bixby says:

        And have you ever been tested yourself? (I have not, btw.)

        Like

      • crimsonprose says:

        No. Despite I question the value, I have kinda nibbled away at my daughters, saying the three club together, it wouldn’t be much to spend on a Xmas present, and they’d get the knowledge, too. But all we’d discover is that our mitochondrian DNA came from Germany-Europe (rather than Iberian-Europe), and those doubtless, ultimately, from Ukraine region. Because that’s the norm in eastern parts of England. My blood group, however, suggests ancestors in central Eurasia, like Kazakhstan or maybe India—but that comes from my father’s line.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Brian Bixby says:

        Though you could be in for a surprise . . . The most common surprise in the U.S.? Southern families who say they have “Indian” blood turn out to have African genes.

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        Yea, I had read that. And it’s true that in tracing the female line (at least to 1730s) there’s a heavy ‘French’ theme. But whence the French? Either the Med via the Romans, or the place I just said. Though the ‘Crisp’ element might suggest Africa, that’s from the grandmother’s paternal line. There’s lots of interesting stuff (huguenots, flemish, probably iberians) but not on that maternal line. And that’s what the DNA test would be.

        Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.