The Making of the Dals

An Alsalda Supplement

The Yamin, sons of Beli, fled the Flood, those who did survive, those three. The Uissids found them, wrapped their arms about them, taught these three, the Yamin, sons of Beli, taught them how to hunt, to fish, to net, to snare. The Uissids taught the Yamin, these three sons of Beli, taught them woodland crafts that they might feast on woodland fruits and build their woodland lairs.

Then said the Uissids: One is one and is alone.

And said the Uissids: Two are two. The Yamin, sons of Beli, ought to rub the bones.
The Uissids said: Now take wives and multiply, for three are needed to survive. And the Yamin, sons of Beli, engendered then the tribes.

The Uissids named them for the gods: for Saram, being the Saramequai, high horse-men of Zrone; for Stoäis, being now the Gousen, Uissid Torund’s cattle-herders; for Artro, now Rizzoni, hunters, crafters, honour of the Uissid Huat.

The Uissids then divided them, counted up their numbers and cut them down to clans. Those clans they named for trees, for trees, the Uissids said, survive while names and bones are lost to stones. Dwelling then upon the Great Plain, like wheat grain strewn upon a fertile field, they multiplied.

But rampant briars too had grown, greedy for the food produced, thirsty for the water. These briars complained they were roped-in, no freedom had they morn to night; their movements were curtailed. And so they stirred and started fomentation. Soon sons of high men sniffed around the lesser wives. Soon sons of low men stole the high man’s gold. Fights then like forest fires destroyed the trees, tore branch from stem, and shredded leaves.

The Uissids had retired, yet so great the violence now amongst the Yamin, sons of Beli, that, instructed by High Saram, the Uissids again appeared to take control.

“Bring the three together,” Saram instructed them. “Then cleave these three tribes four ways.” And this the Uissids did.

One fourth division of the Gousen tribe, one fourth of the Rizzoni, and one fourth of the Saramequai, the Uissids sent to south, there to dwell in Dal Sahalis, to be the Saëntoi there.

Next, one fourth division of the Gousen tribe, one fourth of the Rizzoni, and one fourth of the Saramequai, the Uissids sent to east, there to dwell in Dal Usast, there to be the Ussamen.

And again the division, and one fourth of the Gousen tribe, one fourth of the Rizzoni, and one fourth of the Saramequai, the Uissids sent to north, there to dwell in Dal Nritris (that some call Dal Nertros), there to be the Wallingas and the Gorlings.

And those remaining—one fourth of the Gousen tribe, one fourth of the Rizzoni, and one fourth of the Saramequai—the Uissids sent to west, there to dwell in Dal Uest, to be the Uestin. (Though some say of the tribes of Dal Uest that they ventured west in search of Uat’s Cave, wherein the entrance to the Netherworld where Beli reigns as king. But if that were so they have not found it yet.)

And Saram said in such a way no Dal would turn against another for each Dal was formed of an equal share of the Yamin, the three surviving sons of Beli.

About crispina kemp

Spinner of Asaric and Mythic tales
This entry was posted in Mythic Fiction and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to The Making of the Dals

  1. Brian Bixby says:

    “The Wallingas and Gorlings” sound like tribes of Australians. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

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